$17 BMBN HEPA Filter Main Rolling Brush Handheld Wireless Vacuum Cle Kitchen Home Appliances Vacuums Floor Care Vacuum Accessories BMBN,/hydractinian130056.html,Kitchen Home Appliances , Vacuums Floor Care , Vacuum Accessories,Vacuum,Main,Brush,$17,Handheld,www.travelphotographersmagazine.com,Cle,Wireless,HEPA,Filter,Rolling BMBN,/hydractinian130056.html,Kitchen Home Appliances , Vacuums Floor Care , Vacuum Accessories,Vacuum,Main,Brush,$17,Handheld,www.travelphotographersmagazine.com,Cle,Wireless,HEPA,Filter,Rolling BMBN HEPA Filter Main Rolling Vacuum Wireless Brush Handheld Cle NEW BMBN HEPA Filter Main Rolling Vacuum Wireless Brush Handheld Cle NEW $17 BMBN HEPA Filter Main Rolling Brush Handheld Wireless Vacuum Cle Kitchen Home Appliances Vacuums Floor Care Vacuum Accessories

BMBN HEPA Cheap mail order shopping Filter Main Rolling Vacuum Wireless Brush Handheld Cle NEW

BMBN HEPA Filter Main Rolling Brush Handheld Wireless Vacuum Cle

$17

BMBN HEPA Filter Main Rolling Brush Handheld Wireless Vacuum Cle

|||

Product description

Size Name:2#

100% brand new and high quality
Features:

Made of high-quality materials, durable and practical.
Delicate and exquisite, highly compatible with equipment.
The filter can block pollen, dirt, dust, pet dander and other particles.
Very suitable for asthma patients, allergy patients or pet families.
Washable and reusable.Easy to remove and replace as part of routine maintenance.
For best results, spare parts should be replaced every 2-3 months according to your using frequency.
Application: compatible with Roidmi F8 vacuum cleaner

Specification:
Material: Plastic
Color: As pictures shown.
Optional Style: 2pcs, 3pcs, 3HEP, 8pcs
2pcs: 2 x Carpet Brush
3pcs: 1 x Carpet Brush + 2 x HEPA Filter
3HEP: 3 x HEPA Filter
8pcs: 2 x Carpet Brush + 6 x HEPA Filter
HEPA Filter Diameter: app. 8cm(3.15in)
Carpet Brush Size: app. 23.5x4.8cm(9.25x1.89in)
Quantity: 1 set

Note:
Transition: 1cm=10mm=0.39inch
No retail package.
Please allow 1-3cm error due to manual measurement. pls make sure you do not mind before you bid.
Due to the difference between different monitors, the picture may not reflect the actual color of the item. Thank you!

Package includes:
2pcs: 2 x Carpet Brush
3pcs: 1 x Carpet Brush + 2 x HEPA Filter
3HEP: 3 x HEPA Filter
8pcs: 2 x Carpet Brush + 6 x HEPA Filter
(other accessories demo in the picture is not included.)

BMBN HEPA Filter Main Rolling Brush Handheld Wireless Vacuum Cle

Tuesday, October 19, 2021

Cymbidium gammieanum - Gammie's Cymbidium care and culture

 Cymbidium gammieanum also called as Gammie's Cymbidium, Cyperocymbidium gammieanum, Cyperorchis × gammieana, is a natural hybrid between the species parents of Cymbidium elegans and Cymbidium erythraeum. This species was described by George King and Robert Pantling in 1895.

IDENTIFY CYMBIDIUM GAMMIEANUM - GAMMIE'S CYMBIDIUM

 Cymbidium gammieanum is native to Nepal to Sikkim. It is found growing on steep banks in open mossy evergreen forests of East Himalaya, Nepal at elevations of 1200 to 1800 meters above sea level.

© nolehace

 It is a medium sized, cool growing orchid with a short pseudo-stem. The leaves are narrowly linear, acuminate, narrowing below but somewhat dilated at the equitant base.

 Gammie's Cymbidium blooms in late summer and early fall from the basal, decurved, shorter than the leaves, 62.5 to to 107.5 cm long, lax to dense, 15 to 20 flowered inflorescence with minute floral bracts. The flowers are 6.25 to 7.5 cm in diameter.

CYMBIDIUM GAMMIEANUM - GAMMIE'S CYMBIDIUM CARE AND CULTURE

 Cultural information should only be used as a guide, and should be to be adapted to suit you. Your physical location; where you grow your plants, how much time you have to devote to their care, and many other factors, will need to be taken into account. Only then can you decide on the cultural methods that best suit you and your plants.

Light:

 Cymbidium gammieanum needs the light level of 27000 - 43000 lux during the early growth, this may require 50% shading especially in summer months. Regular growth light level should be at 43000 - 54000 lux (30% shading during summer). At flowering light levels should be at 20000 - 30000 lux. In cool areas or in winter months, full sun is tolerated.

 Watch the color of the leaves; foliage should be yellowish-green in color, but too much light will result in a pale yellow color and if burned, a black spot at the arch of the leaf. If severely burned, the leaf will be bleached white. If too shady, plants will be dark, lush green but will bloom less or not at all.

© nolehace

Temperature:

 Gammie's Cymbidium needs day temperatures of 18-24°C and night temperatures of 7-13°C. For flower initiation, a cooling period needs to occur and lasts for 2-4 months during the late summer and early fall. Once flower spikes appear, flowers become susceptible to temperature again and too higher temperatures can cause flower abortions.

 The plant will tolerate a few degrees of frost, but temperatures of -3°C and below cause damage to the inflorescences. In parts of the country where the weather in winter is extreme, grow the plants outside during spring and summer, and then move them indoors as late as possible at the first threat of frost.

Humidity:

 Cymbidium gammieanum needs the humidity levels of 40 - 60% most of the time, however they can tolerate humidity levels of 60 - 80% in times of high light which will help to also reduce temperature levels. Humidity should also be reduced to 40 - 60% at flowering.

 Good air circulation is essential for good plant growth, supplying oxygen and carbon dioxide and promoting the quick drying off of leaves thus preventing fungal, bacterial and red spider problems. The air surrounding the plant must be moist. Bad ventilation causes poor growth and immature buds to yellow and drop off.

© nolehace
Substrate, growing media and repotting:

 Gammie's Cymbidium are usually grown in pots or containers with excellent drainage, filled with loose, quickly drying substrate, so that the plants can be watered frequently and the substrate is kept dry. Most growers use a mixture based on tree fern bark or chopped fibers. Different amounts of chopped sphagnum moss, osmunda fern roots, sand, perlite, charcoal and fibrous clay are also usually added; many growers use fine to medium bark without additives. Medium granulation bark in the lower half of the pot and in the upper part, fine bark with the addition of about 10% perlite and 10% charcoal works perfectly well.

 The plant should be repotted only if the pot is overcrowded which happens on average every two or three years or when the medium has broken down, for the plant thrive best when left undisturbed. Repotting should be carried out during spring (after flowering). During repotting dead or withered roots should be removed. Older roots should be trimmed up to 10-15 cm from the base of the bulbs; Leave the root tissue to air dry. Always sterilize cutting tools between plants.

 If you decide to divide the plant, look for natural divisions which allow three to five-bulb groupings. If the dormant bulbs (back bulbs) can be removed without destroying the strength of the division, remove them. These can be potted up to resprout and bloom in two to four years.

Watering:

 Cymbidium gammieanum should be watered abundantly during active growth, but there should be excellent drainage and the substrate around the roots should never be soggy or stale. Water more frequently in periods of dry heat and winds and less in cold, wet weather. When the new growths reach maturity in autumn, the amount of water should be gradually reduced.

 The plant love overhead watering during summer and early autumn, but never in the middle of the day on hot days or the leaves will burn and you may cause rot. It is best to overhead water late in the afternoon or early evening when the sun has gone from the plants. Such watering washes dust and dirt from the leaves and allows the plant to take in moisture through the leaves. Do not overhead water or mist in cold or wet winter weather. Water early in the morning in winter so plants can dry out. In winter it is better to under rather than over water.

Fertilizer:

 When the plants are actively growing, from September through to mid December, they must have an NPK fertiliser high in nitrogen to stimulate growth. From mid December, when flower spikes initiate, flowering should be encouraged by the use of a fertiliser high in phosphorous and potash. These assist in the formation of flower spikes, ensuring that the flowers will be bigger and stronger and firm up the leaves thus avoiding soft growth. Fortnightly fertilizing using half recommended strength is advisable. You may prefer to fertilize at quarter strength every week. It is important to always give the plants a good watering before fertilizing, otherwise the roots will burn.

 To avoid mineral deposits building up during periods of heavy fertilization, it is advisable to rinse the containers approximately every month. Rinsing is especially important where the water is highly mineralized. First, water the plant normally to dissolve the accumulated salts, and after about an hour, rinse the substrate with water equal to twice the volume of the container.

Rest period:

 Gammie's Cymbidium should be limited in the amount of water during 2-3 winter months. They should dry up a bit between waterings, but they must not be left without water for too long. Fertilization should be reduced or eliminated until new growths appear in spring, at which point regular watering resumes.

 With high temperature and illumination, the plant may not enter dormancy and produce many new growths on immature forming growth. This would be considered to be a major problem and the whole production can be set back by as much as 2 years.

BUY CYMBIDIUM GAMMIEANUM - GAMMIE'S CYMBIDIUM AND RELATED PRODUCTS

Ladieshow Capture Card,Portable USB 2.0 HDMI Video Capture Card

Sedum praealtum - Green cockscomb - Greater Mexican stonecrop care and culture

 Sedum praealtum, also called as Green cockscomb, Greater Mexican stonecrop, Sedum dendroideum subsp. praealtum, is a species of the genus Sedum. This species was described by Alphonse Pyramus de Candolle in 1847.

IDENTIFY SEDUM PRAEALTUM - GREEN COCKSCOMB - GREATER MEXICAN STONECROP

 Sedum praealtum is native from Mexico to El Salvador. It is found growing on sandy loams in Central Mexico (Chiapas, Hidalgo, Mexico, Michoacán, Oaxaca, Puebla, Querétaro, Tlaxcala, Veracruz), Guatemala at elevations of 1300 meters above sea level. It is also naturalized in Italy and Australia (Queensland).

 Green cockscomb is an evergreen, perennial sub-shrub which reaching 0.3 - 1.0 m high, with glabrous, fleshy leaves and sub-woody stems. The leaves are alternate, crowded at tips of branches, sessile, inserted at right angles to the stem, often curling upward, lanceolate-spatulate, 40 mm long, up to 12 mm wide, light green and shining, apex bluntly pointed, margins entire, turning red especially in the upwardly curved region of the blade.

 Greater Mexican stonecrop blooms in late winter to early spring from the terminal, much-branched, lax cyme inflorescences with yellowish green, dichasial branches, set at right angles to rachis. The flowers are sessile, star-shaped, 17 mm across, sepals yellowish green, petals bright-yellow, stamens bright yellow, carpels greenish yellow.

SEDUM PRAEALTUM - GREEN COCKSCOMB - GREATER MEXICAN STONECROP CARE AND CULTURE

 Cultural information should only be used as a guide, and should be to be adapted to suit you. Your physical location; where you grow your plants, how much time you have to devote to their care, and many other factors, will need to be taken into account. Only then can you decide on the cultural methods that best suit you and your plants.

Light and exposure:

 Sedum praealtum will tolerate partial shade (not full shade), but do best in full sun (6 or more hours of direct sun per day). The higher the better in most cases, a minimum of 50000 lux. The plant require high light to develop strong leaf coloration and will stretch badly under low light conditions. Low light levels can be offset with dry soil conditions, but only for a short period of time.

Temperature:

 Green cockscomb can grow in USDA zone 7-11. The plant prefers the night temperatures of above 13 °C and day time temperature must be at least 18-21 °C. However, the hot days of summer will not be a problem and the temperature of 38 °C can still produce good quality plants. High temperatures and high humidity can create a lot of disease issues, so stay on the lookout.

 The plant can tolerate freezing temperature. When the temperature drop below 10 °C the plant start to go dormant. If you experiment with the plant that are borderline resistant to freezing temperatures, or if you live in an area where the temperature frequently drops below freezing, then consider growing the plant in containers so you can move them indoors for protection from cold conditions.

Substrate and growing media:

 Greater Mexican stonecrop can grow in pot, container or in garden with loose loamy, sandy, or gravelly soil with sharp drainage. Unglazed clay or terra cotta containers dry out more quickly than glazed pottery or plastic pots. When the soil retains too much water, as is often the case with a heavy wet clay soil, this can easily lead to root rot for the plant.

 The plant in containers do require little more care than those in gardens. Repot your plants when they outgrow their current pot by moving them out to a larger container to hold the plant better. Spring is the best time to repot.

Watering:

 Sedum praealtum are drought-tolerant but do need some water. They do their best with regular watering from spring through fall. Water thoroughly and wait for the soil to dry out before watering again. Young plant will need supplemental water for the first couple of weeks to establish roots. Established plants, as long as your area gets rain every couple of weeks at the least, shouldn’t need any extra watering. Avoid wetting the leaves, stems, and flowers when watering. In winter, water just enough to keep your plants from shriveling.

© 11299883

Fertilizer:

 Green cockscomb typically needs no supplemental fertilization and can tolerate nutrient-poor soil. In fact, if the soil is too rich, this can cause weak, leggy growth. If you have very poor soil, mixing some compost into it will generally be enough to give your plant a boost. Chemical fertilizer can lead to stretching and flopping.

Winter period:

 Care needs to be taken to avoid overwatering and over-fertilizing any of these plants especially during the short days, lower light levels, and cooler conditions of winter.

 Covering the plant with a layer of straw or placing a tent made from plastic or bed sheets over the plants can protect them from sudden freezing temperatures; don't allow plastic to touch the plants, however. Remove any kind of covering as soon as the temperature warms.

Pruning:

 Greater Mexican stonecrop don't need deadheading (removing spent blooms), and they often look good even into winter. However, extreme heat and a lack of sunlight both can cause sedum plants to get a bit leggy. Cutting back the plants after they are done flowering can help to maintain their shape and encourage bushier, sturdier growth.

Pests and diseases:

 If over watered or overcrowded, the plant may be subject to infestation by scale insects and/or mealybugs. Slugs and snails may also be problematic outdoors. As with all succulents, overwatering, overcrowding and lack of good air circulation can lead to root and stem rot. To avoid these problems, be sure to give your plants plenty of space to grow and spread. Use an appropriate pesticide to deal with mealybugs and scale insects indoors. Outdoors, encourage natural predators, such as ladybugs and lacewings. Pickoff slugs and snails by hand. Thin plants to reduce hiding places and improve air circulation. Reduce watering to make the environment less welcoming to slugs and snails. Crushed eggshells and/or diatomaceous earth sprinkled on the ground around affected plants may discourage these gastropods.

Propagation:

 Sedum praealtum is very easy to propagate either by stem cuttings or division. For a stem cutting, take cuttings in spring when the plants are in the period of active growth, simply trim off a portion of stem from a healthy plant that's roughly 3 to 6 inches long, and remove the leaves on the lower half. Then, plant the cut end in soil wherever you wish. These prolific stems often will send out roots even if they're just lying on top of soil, but planting them will give them a better shot at healthy growth.

 Each leaves could potentially become a new plant. Choose healthy leaves, remove them from the plant, and allow them to callus for several days. Place the leaves on a well-draining soil mix and keep the soil slightly moist. They should be well rooted after about 2 to 3 weeks, with new plantlets forming at the base.

 To propagate by division, gently dig up a mature plant, and carefully pull apart the roots to separate it into sections. Then, simply replant the sections, making sure the top of the root ball is level with the soil line. Like the stem cuttings, divided sections also will typically be quick to take root.

 Propagation with seeds is the slowest method. Spring or summer is the best time to sow the seeds. Use a well-draining soil mix. Sow the seeds on the soil surface and gently press them down. Keep the soil moist until seeds germinate. Provide a consistent temperature between 15-21 °C. The seeds usually start to germinate after 2 to 4 weeks.

BUY SEDUM PRAEALTUM - GREEN COCKSCOMB - GREATER MEXICAN STONECROP AND RELATED PRODUCTS

BUY ANOTHERS SPECIES AND VARIETIES OF SEDUM GENUS HERE!

Cymbidium borneense - The Borneo Cymbidium care and culture

 Cymbidium borneense, also called as The Borneo Cymbidium, is a species of the genus Cymbidium. This species was described by Jeffrey James Wood in 1983.

IDENTIFY CYMBIDIUM BORNEENSE - THE BORNEO CYMBIDIUM

 Cymbidium borneense is native to Borneo. It is found growing in humus rich soils over limestone often near streams in lowland forests to lower montane forests of Sarawak and Sabah at elevations of 100 to 1300 meters above sea level.

 It is a large sized, hot to warm growing terrestrial with fusiform pseudobulbs enveloped completely by distichous, leaf-bearing sheaths and carrying linear-ligulate, acute, arching, slightly coriaceous, articulated up to 5" above the base leaves.

 The Borneo Cymbidium blooms in the fall on an axillary, erect then arching to pendant, 16 to 18 cm long, 3 to 6 flowered inflorescence with 3 to 5 distant, amplexicaul bracts and narrowly ovate, acute floral bracts. The flowers have coconut scented and are 4 cm in diameter.

CYMBIDIUM BORNEENSE - THE BORNEO CYMBIDIUM CARE AND CULTURE

 Cultural information should only be used as a guide, and should be to be adapted to suit you. Your physical location; where you grow your plants, how much time you have to devote to their care, and many other factors, will need to be taken into account. Only then can you decide on the cultural methods that best suit you and your plants.

Light:

 Cymbidium borneense needs the light level of 27000 - 43000 lux during the early growth, this may require 50% shading especially in summer months. Regular growth light level should be at 43000 - 54000 lux (30% shading during summer). At flowering light levels should be at 20000 - 30000 lux. In cool areas or in winter months, full sun is tolerated.

 Watch the color of the leaves; foliage should be yellowish-green in color, but too much light will result in a pale yellow color and if burned, a black spot at the arch of the leaf. If severely burned, the leaf will be bleached white. If too shady, plants will be dark, lush green but will bloom less or not at all.

© phaltoro
Temperature:

 The Borneo Cymbidium needs day temperatures of 25-28°C and night temperatures of 15-18°C. It is very important for initiation of spikes to have a difference in temperatures between night and day. This can be achieved in the summer by sprinkling the leaves in the late afternoon or early evening for evaporative cooling.

 The plant will tolerate a few degrees of frost, but temperatures of -3°C and below cause damage to the inflorescences. In parts of the country where the weather in winter is extreme, grow the plants outside during spring and summer, and then move them indoors as late as possible at the first threat of frost.

Humidity:

 Cymbidium borneense needs the humidity levels of 40 - 60% most of the time, however they can tolerate humidity levels of 60 - 80% in times of high light which will help to also reduce temperature levels. Humidity should also be reduced to 40 - 60% at flowering.

 Good air circulation is essential for good plant growth, supplying oxygen and carbon dioxide and promoting the quick drying off of leaves thus preventing fungal, bacterial and red spider problems. The air surrounding the plant must be moist. Bad ventilation causes poor growth and immature buds to yellow and drop off.

Substrate, growing media and repotting:

 The Borneo Cymbidium are usually grown in pots or containers with excellent drainage, filled with loose, quickly drying substrate, so that the plants can be watered frequently and the substrate is kept dry. Most growers use a mixture based on tree fern bark or chopped fibers. Different amounts of chopped sphagnum moss, osmunda fern roots, sand, perlite, charcoal and fibrous clay are also usually added; many growers use fine to medium bark without additives. Medium granulation bark in the lower half of the pot and in the upper part, fine bark with the addition of about 10% perlite and 10% charcoal works perfectly well.

 The plant should be repotted only if the pot is overcrowded which happens on average every two or three years or when the medium has broken down, for the plant thrive best when left undisturbed. Repotting should be carried out during spring (after flowering). During repotting dead or withered roots should be removed. Older roots should be trimmed up to 10-15 cm from the base of the bulbs; Leave the root tissue to air dry. Always sterilize cutting tools between plants.

 If you decide to divide the plant, look for natural divisions which allow three to five-bulb groupings. If the dormant bulbs (back bulbs) can be removed without destroying the strength of the division, remove them. These can be potted up to resprout and bloom in two to four years.

Watering:

 Cymbidium borneense should be watered abundantly during active growth, but there should be excellent drainage and the substrate around the roots should never be soggy or stale. Water more frequently in periods of dry heat and winds and less in cold, wet weather. When the new growths reach maturity in autumn, the amount of water should be gradually reduced.

 The plant love overhead watering during summer and early autumn, but never in the middle of the day on hot days or the leaves will burn and you may cause rot. It is best to overhead water late in the afternoon or early evening when the sun has gone from the plants. Such watering washes dust and dirt from the leaves and allows the plant to take in moisture through the leaves. Do not overhead water or mist in cold or wet winter weather. Water early in the morning in winter so plants can dry out. In winter it is better to under rather than over water.

Fertilizer:

 When the plants are actively growing, from September through to mid December, they must have an NPK fertiliser high in nitrogen to stimulate growth. From mid December, when flower spikes initiate, flowering should be encouraged by the use of a fertiliser high in phosphorous and potash. These assist in the formation of flower spikes, ensuring that the flowers will be bigger and stronger and firm up the leaves thus avoiding soft growth. Fortnightly fertilizing using half recommended strength is advisable. You may prefer to fertilize at quarter strength every week. It is important to always give the plants a good watering before fertilizing, otherwise the roots will burn.

 To avoid mineral deposits building up during periods of heavy fertilization, it is advisable to rinse the containers approximately every month. Rinsing is especially important where the water is highly mineralized. First, water the plant normally to dissolve the accumulated salts, and after about an hour, rinse the substrate with water equal to twice the volume of the container.

Rest period:

 The Borneo Cymbidium should be limited in the amount of water during 2-3 winter months. They should dry up a bit between waterings, but they must not be left without water for too long. Fertilization should be reduced or eliminated until new growths appear in spring, at which point regular watering resumes.

BUY CYMBIDIUM BORNEENSE - THE BORNEO CYMBIDIUM AND RELATED PRODUCTS

Elysee Unisex Adult Analogue Automatic Watch with Leather Strap

Sedum villosum - Hairy stonecrop - Purple stonecrop care and culture

 Sedum villosum, also called as Hairy stonecrop, Purple stonecrop, Sedella villosa, Oreosedum villosum, Hjaltalinia villosa, Sedum pentandrum, Sedum insulare, Sedum glandulosum var. minus, is a species of the genus Sedum. This species was described by Carl Linnaeus in 1753.

IDENTIFY SEDUM VILLOSUM - HAIRY STONECROP - PURPLE STONECROP

 Sedum villosum is native to Western, central and northern Europe (in the north to Iceland and Greenland, in the east to Lithuania and Poland), eastern Canada (islands of the Gulf of St. Lawrence). It is found growing in scattered, wet places and seepages, calcifuge at elevations of 1350 - 3000 meters above sea level.

 Hairy stonecrop is a biennial (rarely annual or perennial) herbs which reaching 5 - 15 cm tall with fibrous roots and short sterile branches and leaves in rosettes. The leaves are alternate, linear, semi-terete with flattened upper face, obtuse, 3 - 8 mm, glandular-hairy, in rosettes.

 Purple stonecrop blooms in June to August from the dense to congested corymbs inflorescences. The flowers are 5-merous, sepals glandular-hairy, petals stellately spreading, pink-red, dorsally with darker midvein area and rarely glandular-hairy.

SEDUM VILLOSUM - HAIRY STONECROP - PURPLE STONECROP CARE AND CULTURE

 Cultural information should only be used as a guide, and should be to be adapted to suit you. Your physical location; where you grow your plants, how much time you have to devote to their care, and many other factors, will need to be taken into account. Only then can you decide on the cultural methods that best suit you and your plants.

Light and exposure:

 Sedum villosum can grow in half shade (not full shade), full sun (6 or more hours of direct sun per day). The higher the better in most cases, a minimum of 50000 lux. The plant require high light to develop strong leaf coloration and will stretch badly under low light conditions. Low light levels can be offset with dry soil conditions, but only for a short period of time.

Temperature:

 Hairy stonecrop can grow in USDA zone 5-10. The plant prefers the night temperatures of above 13 °C and day time temperature must be at least 18-21 °C. However, the hot days of summer will not be a problem and the temperature of 38 °C can still produce good quality plants. High temperatures and high humidity can create a lot of disease issues, so stay on the lookout.

 The plant can tolerate freezing temperature. When the temperature drop below 10 °C the plant start to go dormant. If you experiment with the plant that are borderline resistant to freezing temperatures, or if you live in an area where the temperature frequently drops below freezing, then consider growing the plant in containers so you can move them indoors for protection from cold conditions.

Substrate and growing media:

 Purple stonecrop can grow in pot, container or in garden with loose loamy, sandy, or gravelly soil. Unglazed clay or terra cotta containers dry out more quickly than glazed pottery or plastic pots. The plant in containers do require little more care than those in gardens. Repot your plants when they outgrow their current pot by moving them out to a larger container to hold the plant better. Spring is the best time to repot.

Watering:

 Sedum villosum is one of the most difficult Sedum species to perpetuate in cultivation due to its odd habitats of peat bog, saturated, shady rock faces, and the edges of rivulets. It seems very contrary for a succulent to adapt to areas that are soaking wet for much of the time.

 As part of a garden feature with running water, this species would probably thrive and give much pleasure. Otherwise, grow it in a clay pot of peaty soil, standing in a large dish of water, in half shade, in an airy spot.

Fertilizer:

 Hairy stonecrop typically needs no supplemental fertilization and can tolerate nutrient-poor soil. In fact, if the soil is too rich, this can cause weak, leggy growth. If you have very poor soil, mixing some compost into it will generally be enough to give your plant a boost. Chemical fertilizer can lead to stretching and flopping.

Winter period:

 Care needs to be taken to avoid overwatering and over-fertilizing any of these plants especially during the short days, lower light levels, and cooler conditions of winter.

 Covering the plant with a layer of straw or placing a tent made from plastic or bed sheets over the plants can protect them from sudden freezing temperatures; don't allow plastic to touch the plants, however. Remove any kind of covering as soon as the temperature warms.

Pruning:

 Purple stonecrop don't need deadheading (removing spent blooms), and they often look good even into winter. However, extreme heat and a lack of sunlight both can cause sedum plants to get a bit leggy. Cutting back the plants after they are done flowering can help to maintain their shape and encourage bushier, sturdier growth.

Pests and diseases:

 If over watered or overcrowded, the plant may be subject to infestation by scale insects and/or mealybugs. Slugs and snails may also be problematic outdoors. As with all succulents, overwatering, overcrowding and lack of good air circulation can lead to root and stem rot. To avoid these problems, be sure to give your plants plenty of space to grow and spread. Use an appropriate pesticide to deal with mealybugs and scale insects indoors. Outdoors, encourage natural predators, such as ladybugs and lacewings. Pickoff slugs and snails by hand. Thin plants to reduce hiding places and improve air circulation. Reduce watering to make the environment less welcoming to slugs and snails. Crushed eggshells and/or diatomaceous earth sprinkled on the ground around affected plants may discourage these gastropods.

Propagation:

 Sedum villosum is very easy to propagate either by stem cuttings or division. For a stem cutting, take cuttings in spring when the plants are in the period of active growth, simply trim off a portion of stem from a healthy plant that's roughly 3 to 6 inches long, and remove the leaves on the lower half. Then, plant the cut end in soil wherever you wish. These prolific stems often will send out roots even if they're just lying on top of soil, but planting them will give them a better shot at healthy growth.

 Each leaves could potentially become a new plant. Choose healthy leaves, remove them from the plant, and allow them to callus for several days. Place the leaves on a well-draining soil mix and keep the soil slightly moist. They should be well rooted after about 2 to 3 weeks, with new plantlets forming at the base.

 To propagate by division, gently dig up a mature plant, and carefully pull apart the roots to separate it into sections. Then, simply replant the sections, making sure the top of the root ball is level with the soil line. Like the stem cuttings, divided sections also will typically be quick to take root.

 Propagation with seeds is the slowest method. Spring or summer is the best time to sow the seeds. Use a well-draining soil mix. Sow the seeds on the soil surface and gently press them down. Keep the soil moist until seeds germinate. Provide a consistent temperature between 15-21 °C. The seeds usually start to germinate after 2 to 4 weeks.

BUY SEDUM VILLOSUM - HAIRY STONECROP - PURPLE STONECROP AND RELATED PRODUCTS

BUY ANOTHERS SPECIES AND VARIETIES OF SEDUM GENUS HERE!

Sunday, October 10, 2021

Cymbidium elongatum - The Elongate Cymbidium care and culture

 Cymbidium elongatum also called as The Elongate Cymbidium, is a species of the genus Cymbidium. This species was described by Jeffrey James Wood, David J. Du Puy and Phyau Soon Shim in 1988.

IDENTIFY CYMBIDIUM ELONGATUM - THE ELONGATE CYMBIDIUM

 Cymbidium elongatum is native to Borneo (Sabah, Sarawak). It is found growing terrestrial in marshy areas in open, scrubby woodland of stunted trees, often rooted at the base of Leptospermum or amongst rattans, sedges, Ericacae and Begonia on sandstone or ultrabasic serpentine rock, or occasionally epiphytic (Sarwak) at elevations of 1200 to 2300 meters above sea level.

 It is a medium to giant sized, cool to cold growing, monopodial, scrambling terrestria,l occasionally epiphytic orchid with a simple, elongate, erect to reclining stem enveloped completely by persistent, leaf-less to leaf-bearing sheaths. The leaves are 4 to 8, distichous, broadly linear, ensiform to ligulate, conduplicate, gently curving, obtuse, mucronate, coriaceous, articulated to the leaf sheaths.

 The Elongate Cymbidium blooms in spring and fall from the axillary, lax, 1 to 4 flowered, racemose inflorescence that is enveloped by 6, narrowly elliptic, acute to acuminate, scarious, basal bracts both concealed within the conduplicate leaf blade and has ovate to triangular-ovate, acute, scarious floral bracts. The flowers are 4 cm in diameter and are slightly fragrant.

CYMBIDIUM ELONGATUM - THE ELONGATE CYMBIDIUM CARE AND CULTURE

 Cultural information should only be used as a guide, and should be to be adapted to suit you. Your physical location; where you grow your plants, how much time you have to devote to their care, and many other factors, will need to be taken into account. Only then can you decide on the cultural methods that best suit you and your plants.

Light:

 Cymbidium elongatum needs light level of 15000 - 25000 lux (shade to bright light). The light should be filtered or dispersed, and the plants should not be exposed to direct sunlight in the afternoon hours. Strong air movement should be ensured all the time.

 Watch the color of the leaves; foliage should be yellowish-green in color, but too much light will result in a pale yellow color and if burned, a black spot at the arch of the leaf. If severely burned, the leaf will be bleached white. If too shady, plants will be dark, lush green but will bloom less or not at all.

© Marta

Temperature:

 The Elongate Cymbidium needs day temperatures of 18-24°C and night temperatures of 7-13°C. For flower initiation, a cooling period needs to occur and lasts for 2-4 months during the late summer and early fall. Once flower spikes appear, flowers become susceptible to temperature again and too higher temperatures can cause flower abortions.

 The plant will tolerate a few degrees of frost, but temperatures of -3°C and below cause damage to the inflorescences. In parts of the country where the weather in winter is extreme, grow the plants outside during spring and summer, and then move them indoors as late as possible at the first threat of frost.

Humidity:

 Cymbidium elongatum needs the humidity levels of 40 - 60% most of the time, however they can tolerate humidity levels of 60 - 80% in times of high light which will help to also reduce temperature levels. Humidity should also be reduced to 40 - 60% at flowering.

 Good air circulation is essential for good plant growth, supplying oxygen and carbon dioxide and promoting the quick drying off of leaves thus preventing fungal, bacterial and red spider problems. The air surrounding the plant must be moist. Bad ventilation causes poor growth and immature buds to yellow and drop off.

Substrate, growing media and repotting:

 The Elongate Cymbidium are usually grown in pots or containers with excellent drainage, filled with loose, quickly drying substrate, so that the plants can be watered frequently and the substrate is kept dry. Most growers use a mixture based on tree fern bark or chopped fibers. Different amounts of chopped sphagnum moss, osmunda fern roots, sand, perlite, charcoal and fibrous clay are also usually added; many growers use fine to medium bark without additives. Medium granulation bark in the lower half of the pot and in the upper part, fine bark with the addition of about 10% perlite and 10% charcoal works perfectly well.

 The plant should be repotted only if the pot is overcrowded which happens on average every two or three years or when the medium has broken down, for the plant thrive best when left undisturbed. Repotting should be carried out during spring (after flowering). During repotting dead or withered roots should be removed. Older roots should be trimmed up to 10-15 cm from the base of the bulbs; Leave the root tissue to air dry. Always sterilize cutting tools between plants.

 If you decide to divide the plant, look for natural divisions which allow three to five-bulb groupings. If the dormant bulbs (back bulbs) can be removed without destroying the strength of the division, remove them. These can be potted up to resprout and bloom in two to four years.

Watering:

 Cymbidium elongatum should be watered abundantly during active growth, but there should be excellent drainage and the substrate around the roots should never be soggy or stale. Water more frequently in periods of dry heat and winds and less in cold, wet weather. When the new growths reach maturity in autumn, the amount of water should be gradually reduced.

 The plant love overhead watering during summer and early autumn, but never in the middle of the day on hot days or the leaves will burn and you may cause rot. It is best to overhead water late in the afternoon or early evening when the sun has gone from the plants. Such watering washes dust and dirt from the leaves and allows the plant to take in moisture through the leaves. Do not overhead water or mist in cold or wet winter weather. Water early in the morning in winter so plants can dry out. In winter it is better to under rather than over water.

Fertilizer:

 When the plants are actively growing, from September through to mid December, they must have an NPK fertiliser high in nitrogen to stimulate growth. From mid December, when flower spikes initiate, flowering should be encouraged by the use of a fertiliser high in phosphorous and potash. These assist in the formation of flower spikes, ensuring that the flowers will be bigger and stronger and firm up the leaves thus avoiding soft growth. Fortnightly fertilizing using half recommended strength is advisable. You may prefer to fertilize at quarter strength every week. It is important to always give the plants a good watering before fertilizing, otherwise the roots will burn.

 To avoid mineral deposits building up during periods of heavy fertilization, it is advisable to rinse the containers approximately every month. Rinsing is especially important where the water is highly mineralized. First, water the plant normally to dissolve the accumulated salts, and after about an hour, rinse the substrate with water equal to twice the volume of the container.

Rest period:

 The Elongate Cymbidium should be limited in the amount of water during 2-3 winter months. They should dry up a bit between waterings, but they must not be left without water for too long. Fertilization should be reduced or eliminated until new growths appear in spring, at which point regular watering resumes.

BUY CYMBIDIUM ELONGATUM - THE ELONGATE CYMBIDIUM AND RELATED PRODUCTS

Windproof Travel Firetruck Umbrella ?Fit Handbag Backpack Compac